CBNA FFA Chapter Members Honored at Awards Banquet

The Coe-Brown Northwood Academy Chapter of FFA recently held its award banquet to honor recipients at the various levels of achievement in FFA. The recipients are as follows: Greenhand Degree Recipients: Alissa Ames, Colin Gollihur, Cole Hodgdon, Matthew Messenger, Patrick Murray, John Renner, Kelsey Pease, Meghan Wimsatt, Elizabeth Parece, Curtis Corson, Courtney Gervais, Hannah Mattson, Elijah Tomlinson-Burrell, Dakota McPhee, Daydrian Morin, Daniel Gallant, Jackson Boucher, Zac Fraser, and Cody Blades. Chapter Degree Recipients: Alissa Ames, Colin Gollihur, Cole Hodgdon, Matthew Messenger, Patrick Murray, John Renner, Elizabeth Parece, Curtis Corson, Hannah Mattson, and Daniel Gallant. Honorary Chapter Degree Recipient: Assistant Headmaster, Ms. Caryn Lasky. To earn a Chapter Profinciency Award, a student must excel in a particular area of expertise. Entrepreneurship means that they own their project and placement means that they work for someone else. Chapter Proficiency Awards were awarded to: Nicole Anthony- Small Animal Production- Placement; Luke BelbinForage Production- Placement; Preston Bethke Specialty Animal Production- Placement; Zac Fraser- Home and Community Development- Entrepreneurship; Joe Garcia- Sheep Production-Entrepreneurship; Daniel GallantAgriculture Sales- Placement; Courtney Gervais- Specialty Animal Production- Placement; Ryan Graeme- Home and Community Development- Placement; Nick Jensen- Agricultural Mechanics Repair and Maintenance- Placement; Madeleine LounsburyAgricultural Sales- Placement; Kelsie PittmanGoat Production- Entrepreneurship; Devin Sullivan- Diversified Horticulture- Placement; Hunter Tetu Forage Production-Placement; Elizabeth Ward-Specialty Animal Production- Entrepreneurship; Faith Wilson Landscape Management- Placement. Star Awards represent the best among FFA Degree Recepients. These students have mastered skills in production, finance, management and/or research. Star Awards went to the follpwing students: Star Greenhand Colin Gollihur; Star Chapter Farmer Joe Garcia; Star Agricultural Placement  Preston Bethke; and Outstanding Service Award- Ryan Graeme. Congratulations to all award winners.

CBNA FFA Much-to-Do Chapter Announces State Convention Award Recipients

Members of the CBNA FFA Much-To-Do Chapter attend the 2017 State Convention with their advisors Mrs. Sarah Ward (right) and Mr. Charles Whitten (left)

At the recent State FAA Convention held at held at the Mount Washington Hotel, Bretton Woods, NH on April 6-8, 2017, Coe-Brown Northwood Academy FFA’s Much-To-Do Chapter received a number of State Awards and Recognitions. In the category of SAE Recognition (second year members only),  Olivia Pittman received a Gold Runner up in Entrepreneurship; Joe Garcia received silver third place in Entrepreneurship; and Madeleine Lounsbury received silver third place in Placement.(In Entrepreneurship the student owns the project. In Placement, the project is in a workplace.) Proficiency Awards went to Faith Wilson, a Gold Runner up in  Nursery Landscape Placement for working for her father’s landscaping business and Sydney Wilson who was the State Winner in Agriculture Sales and Service for working at a Farmer’s Market. State Degree Recipients were Preston Bethke, Ryan Graeme and Hunter Tetu. In Career Development Events the team consisting of Faith Wilson, Ryan Graeme, Preston Bethke, Devin Sullivan, Nicole Anthony, Sarah Jensen and Madeleine Lounsbury placed third in Nursery and Landscaping. The team consisting of Joe Garcia, Olivia Pittman, Baily Travers, and Paul Bane received second place in Agriculture Sales and Service with the high individual on the team Joe Garcia in third place. In Forestry, the team consisting of Faith Wilson, Hunter Tetu, Ryan Graeme, Tyler Millette, Dan Gallant and Daydrian Morin took fourth place. In Career Skills- Freshman & Sophomore Level, freshman Colin Gollihur took third place individual. Students who also participated in Career Development Events who did well but did not place included Elizabeth Ward in Animal Welfare, Sarah Jensen in Creed Speaking, and Paul Bane in Chapter Display. Chapter Delegates that were selected are Sarah Jensen and Paul Bane, and Madeleine Lounsbury was selected as a Nominating Committee Member. Congratulations to all the state award winners.

 

 

CBNA FBLA Chapter Attends State Leadership Conference

CBNA FBLA (from left) Michael Mulligan, Joel Boulanger, Caitlyn Pitre, Ander Wensberg, Mikayla Prina, Donald MacCallum, Advisor  Dr. JoAnn Zylak, Peter Vollersten, & Derek Meyer attend the FBLA State Leadership Conference.

Coe-Brown Northwood Academy’s Future Business Leaders of America attended the 45th State Leadership Conference held at the Radisson Hotel in Manchester, NH on March 23 & 24, 2017. Those who participated in the State Leadership Conference were Ander Wensberg of Strafford who competed with Donald MacCallum of Epsom in Graphic Design. The team of Chelsea McCallion, Michael Mulligan, and Caitlyn Pitre of Strafford, and Northwood respectively also participated. Mikayla Prina of Nottingham and Joel Boulanger of Northwood competed in Economics. Derek Meyer of Nottingham competed in Personal Finance. Our three State Finalists this year included Peter Vollertsen of Strafford competing in Insurance; Liu Yong, an exchange student residing in Deerfield, competing in Business Calculations and Nate Schroeder of Strafford placing in Impromptu Speaking. Wrapping up the competitions was Summer Barnes of Strafford placing first overall in the Organ Awareness project that she chaired as a state project. In addition to this, the Coe-Brown Northwood Academy FBLA Chapter received second place in the Making Cents state officer project, and also received the Honorary Chapter Award.

 

Public Speaking Students Attend the HYPE Convention at UNH

CBNA Public Speaking students (from left) Nick Shutt, Caitlin Pitre, Governor Lynch, Joseph Guptill and Abigail Devaney attended the annual HYPE (Hosting Young Philosophy Enthusiasts) Convention at UNH on Thursday, March 16, where they met with Governor Lynch and 1000 other NH students to explore the role of a responsible citizen in today’s society.

CBNA Theatre to Present The Birds: A Modern Adaptation by Don Zolodis

CBNA students (from left) Cassandra Barnhart as Procne, Brian Downer as Epops, Joseph Guptill as Eulpides and Ian Gollihur as Pithetaerus rehearse a scene from The Birds: A Modern Adaptation.

CBNA students (from left) Cassandra Barnhart as Procne, Brian Downer as Epops, Joseph Guptill as Eulpides and Ian Gollihur as Pithetaerus rehearse a scene from The Birds: A Modern Adaptation.

Looking for a little humor to lift your spirits this winter? Then the theatre students of Coe-Brown Northwood Academy have just the cure, as they present The Birds: A Modern Adaptation by Don Zolodis on March 9, 10 at 7 pm and March 11 at 2 pm in the Gerrish Gym on the CBNA Campus in Northwood. Based on Aristophanes’ comedy first performed in 414 B.C., The Birds: A Modern Adaptation tells the story of two miscreants who are fed up with a world of insurance salesmen and petty problems and flee to the kingdom of the birds for a simpler life. While living there, the two scheme up a financial jackpot that could turn the bird’s land into a powerful utopia. Their only obstacle: the wrath of the gods. A hilarious and satirical look at politics, religion and the foolishness of mankind that revives and revamps Aristophanes’ classic comedy. Senior Joseph Guptill and sophomore Ian Gollihur playing miscreants Eulpides and Pithetaerus respectively, lead an enthusiastic cast of thirty-one students including seniors Cassandra Barnhart, Marissa Gast, Arianna Jones and Kelsey Wallace; juniors Sandra Black, Erin Boodey, Zachary Helm, Nina Laramee, Jacob Lock, Cailinn Monahan, Kayla Pollak, Alyssa Reiff, Allison Rose, Julia Sommer and Courtney Snow; sophomores Braelin Ash, Dylan DeTrude, Brian Downer, Mackenzie Flanders, Cassuarina French, Cooper Leduke, Cody Peck and Madison Rollins; and freshmen Patrick Helm, Connor Nowak, Abbi Pelletier, Caitlin Reynolds, Rylee Rogers and Lauren Rose. The production is directed by faculty member Elizabeth Lent with assistance from faculty member Kolby Hume. Caution, The Birds: A Modern Adaptation is not recommended for younger audiences. Reserved tickets are $8 for adults and $6 for students and seniors and will be available starting March 6 by email – elent@coebrown.org , by calling 603-942-5531 ext. 237, at the main office before or after school or at the door. This will be just the cure for the winter blues. Hope to see you there.

CBNA Students Recognized for 2017 Scholastic Writing Awards

A number of Coe-Brown Northwood Academy students were recently recognized by the National Writing Project in New Hampshire through The Scholastic Art & Writing Awards. This is a remarkable achievement and milestone for young writers at CBNA who were mentored by English department faculty.  A panel of writers, teachers, and literary professionals selected their work as being among the best works submitted by New Hampshire teenagers. Students are judged against other entries in the following categories: fiction, flash fiction, poetry, personal memoirs, persuasive essays, humor, science fiction and fantasy.  Of the more than 750 submissions to The Scholastic Writing Awards that New Hampshire students sent this year, the following students from CBNA were honored:

Silver Keys—Cassandra Barnhart (Northwood), Shannon Jackson (2) (Nottingham), Tristan Jardon (Nottingham), Mirah Johnston (Nottingham), Caroline Lavoie (Barrington), Olivia Roach (Nottingham), Kelsey Wallace (Strafford)

Honorable Mentions – Braelin Ash (Northwood), Alicia Baratier (Strafford), Lauren Best (Nottingham), Ruby Carr (Nottingham), Addison Craven (Strafford), Caroline Lavoie (2) (Barrington), Olivia Lee (Strafford), Lily Libbey (Strafford), Noah Olewine (Northwood), Nicholas Shutt (Northwood), Madison Tortorella-Lewis (Barrington)

In May, all award recipients, including those whose work was selected as honorable mention, will be invited to attend the NH regional awards ceremony to be held at Plymouth State University. In addition, every piece of writing which received a gold or silver key or an honorable mention will be published in this year’s edition of Middle/High School Voices.  Congratulations to this next generation of writers.

CBNA FBLA Organ Donor Awareness Day

On January 11, 2017, the Coe-Brown Northwood Academy chapter of FBLA held activities related to Organ Donation Awareness Day. The chapter distributed green ribbons and talked to students about the statistical need for organ donors, as well as asking students to consider being organ donors when their drivers’ licenses come up for renewal. Coincidentally, CBNA sponsored a Red Cross Blood Drive on the same day, which FBLA members assisted with and many FBLA members donated blood for the first time. In addition, several Economics classes participated in a research writing project explaining reasons for the demand for organ donors, and reasons for the supply not meeting the demands for donors. CBNA FBLA chapter secretary senior Summer Barnes, who is heading the CBNA chapter initiative for the New Hampshire FBLA Organ Donor project contributed the following paper:

The Market for Organs by Summer Barnes, ‘17

The world is full of gracious people waiting to help those in need.  There are also many people looking out for themselves and ready to make a quick buck off anything they can.  These two types of people are what causes the debate on whether or not there should be a market for organ donation.  Around the world there are many people in need of organs, blood, bone marrow, etc.  People in need typically have a very short window of time to receive what they need. There are no to little organs available to those who are in desperate need of them.  It seems obvious that a market for organs would solve the problem at hand.  However, the question remains on whether or not this would be equitable and efficient.  Despite these reasonable concerns, a market in organs is the only sensible solution to helping the people who are in urgent need of this vital necessity.

The government is utilized for its various resources in many aspects of everyday life.  Law enforcement is a major source of cost for the government.  Each year around 100 billion dollars are spent on police units and law enforcement in the United States (Justice Policy Institute).  Most of this spending is used to control illegal trade of drugs, people, organs, etc.  This valuable money and time could be being employed elsewhere in the country.  If an organ market was created there would be less pressure on the police forces to control this aspect of illegal trade.  The market would provide viable opportunity for the funds to be shifted elsewhere; thus creating more time and money to be spent on more pressing matters, such as the drastic rise in human trafficking and drug trade.  The United States is in desperate need of more law enforcement to control this rising problem, however they are lacking sufficient funds to increase the already extremely expensive budget.  The creation of an organ market would give more time and money to other more pressing needs (How the Government Controls What You Buy and Sell).  This is just one of the many reasons why the United States should legalize organ trade and provide the resources to establish an organ market.

America has always been known as a country of opportunity and promise.  However, there have been points throughout American history where a certain class of people have been left to greatly suffer.  Over the years the government has provided new ways to help the less fortunate.  Less governmental attention, and less suffering would occur if organs were allowed to be sold for money or in exchange of products or services.  As of 2014, 47 million Americans were reported to be living in poverty (Poverty Facts).  This is about 14 percent of the population.  In spite of this, these numbers could be greatly reduced if people were allowed to sell non-vital organs when they were in desperate need of money. For example, a kidney is estimated to be sold for around 262,000 dollars on the black market (Jade).  This large sum of money could greatly benefit people suffering from job loss.  Being able to sell organs would not only benefit the people selling them, but the people in desperate need of said organs.

Across the world, children, adults, and seniors are in need of an organ. This may be due to a rare illness or condition, an accident, etc.  Despite the cause, each day 22 people die while awaiting an organ transplant (Organ Donation Statistics).  Twenty-two people a day is far too many to be lost to a problem that could be resolved.  Most humans are walking around with two kidneys, one of which they do not need.  These useless organs could be vital to other people.  An organ market would instigate the beginning of more organ donations.  As of now not nearly enough organs are donated to cover the amount of demand.  If people were allowed to trade their organs on free choice with possible benefits to them, this may promote more donations.  A simple change of law would allow so many lives to be saved, so many families spared the suffering of losing a loved one.

The selling of ones’ organs comes across as gruesome and unethical. Despite the negative persona organ trade receives, it is absolutely necessary to save many people each year.  There are several reasons why organ trade should be legalized.  It would reduce the amount of law enforcement money and time spent on controlling illegal trade of organs.  An opportunity to make a large sum of money off an organ that is not necessarily needed, would provide people in poverty with a chance to get back on their feet.  However, most importantly it would help save countless lives that are lost each day because they were awaiting an organ transplant.

Works Cited

“How the Government Controls What You Buy and Sell.” Lard Bucket. N.p., n.d. Web. 02 Dec. 2016.

Jade. “How Much is Your Kidney Worth on the Black Market?” REV 96.7. N.p., 23 Apr 2012. Web. 02 Dec 2012.

Justice Policy Institute. “United States Continuing to Overspend on Police, Despite Decreasing Crime Rates”, Justice Policy Institute. N.p., 22 May 2012. Web. 02 Dec 2016.

“Organ Statistics.” Organdonor.gov. N.p., n.d. Web. 02 Dec 2016.

“Poverty Facts.” Catholic Bishops. N.p., n.d. Web. 02 Dec 2016.

The Time of Giving: CBNA FCCLA

by Victoria Sheridan  ‘18

Items collected by CBNA FCCLA to help the community during this holiday season.

Items collected by CBNA FCCLA to help the community during this holiday season.

With the holiday season comes the spirit of charity and a time of giving. People are more generous during the holidays, and CBNA’s FCCLA (Family Career and Community Leaders of America) feels that way too. From Parent’s Night Out on December 9th to our backpack drive for End 68 Hours of Hunger, we are doing our part to make the holidays a happy time for everyone. FCCLA is also filling and donating stockings to Santa’s Helpers in Northwood as part of their Christmas Drive.

Over the past two months, FCCLA has participated in community building activities, including a CTSO (Career and Technical Student Organization) dinner, where all Coe-Brown’s vocational clubs (FCCLA, FBLA, and FFA) joined together for a spaghetti dinner and friendship building activities. FCCLA helped with the Feed My Starving Children food pack at Turbocam in Barrington in November. FMSC packs dehydrated food full of essential nutrients and sends the bags to those in need all over the world.

As always, FCCLA hopes to continue to participate in community services events into the New Year. We hope that your New Year is phenomenal, and that you join us in the spirit of giving this holiday season too!

 

CBNA Ugly Sweater Day 2016

CBNA students and staff embrace their holiday ugly sweaters at the recent CBNA Ugly Sweater Event.

CBNA students and staff embrace their holiday ugly sweaters at the recent CBNA Ugly Sweater Event.

On Friday, December 9, students and staff at Coe-Brown Northwood Academy were recently caught spreading a bit of holiday cheer on the school’s annual “Ugly Holiday Sweater” day. Students competed for a chance to win gift cards to Dunkin Donuts by wearing their ugliest sweaters. Sweaters were judged by a panel of faculty members. This year’s winners were senior Joseph Guptill in the category of ugliest unaltered sweater and junior Courtney Snow for the ugliest altered sweater. This activity provides a chance for CBNA students and staff to get into the holiday spirit and spread some good cheer throughout the school community.

 

CBNA FFA Students Attend Chainsaw Safety Course

Mr. Dan Tilton instructs CBNA FFA students in a recent chainsaw safety course on the CBNA Campus.

Mr. Dan Tilton instructs CBNA FFA students in a recent chainsaw safety course on the CBNA Campus.

Coe-Brown Northwood Academy FFA students Faith Wilson, Ryan Graeme, Preston Bethke, Devin Sullivan, Sam Whitehouse, Nick Jenson, Nik Mewkill, Troy Russo, Caleb Rollins, Evan Wimsatt, Wayne Libby, Jackie Joy, Molly Swansburg, Matthew Brown and Brenda Hayes recently had the opportunity to attend a chainsaw safety course at CBNA taught by Mr. Dan Tilton of Tilton Equipment, Rye, NH. A resident of Strafford, NH, Mr. Tilton instructed students on everything they needed to know about chainsaws including correct safety equipment, how to correctly and safely hold and operate a chainsaw, and the parts of a chainsaw and the purpose for each part. He also showed students how to properly sharpen a chain and the different types of chains used for different types of logging. Part of Mr. Tilton’s instruction also included the correct way to fell and limb a tree, the way to avoid injury from a kick back from a chain saw and the way to control it when it happens.